Welcome to LP Films
A Creative Film Production Studio

Check out our work

Meet the Team

We promise they won't bite.

LT

LT

Executive Producer
Arthur

Arthur

Creative Director
Andrej

Andrej

D.O.P
Luther

Luther

Art Director
Jenny

Jenny

Accountant
Mio

Mio

Production Manager
Catherline

Catherline

Copywriter
Nate

Nate

Head of Post-production
Matthew

Matthew

Creative Planner
Nico

Nico

Admin Assistant
Apple

Apple

Editing Assistant
Nic

Nic

Amazing Assistant

Portfolio

Check out some of our films.

 

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About

LP-Films-Office

LostPensivos Films has been producing high-quality documentaries and commercial films since 2002. Our award-winning documentaries include A Farewell Song, The Poseidon Project and The Making of the Special Olympics. Commercial clients have included Disney, ExxonMobil, Philips, Unilever and most of the major advertising agencies. We’ve also provided production services for overseas broadcasters looking to shoot in China, including the BBC, Channel Four, ITV, National Geographic and Discovery Channel. Since 2007, our time-lapse division, ChinaTimelapse, has been shooting creative time-lapse for film and television as well as large-scale and legacy construction projects.

 

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Full Service

LP Films is a full service film production company that specialises in cinematic storytelling. Our mission is to authentically connect our clients to their desired audience with quality films that live on the web, social platforms and in broadcast. Contact us to find out what we can do for you.

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Creative Team

Unlike other film production companies, we have our own in-house creative team who will help develop your idea into a high-quality film. Our creative team is composed of both native English and Chinese speakers allowing your project to be produced in both languages simultaneously.

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Production Services

For overseas production companies planning to shoot in China, LP Films has the contacts and experience to arrange your whole trip, including: permission to shoot, equipment, crew, cast, post-production facilities, hotels and internal flights, as well as specialist services including time-lapse, aerial and crane / jib work.

 

We create, shoot and edit beautiful films.
Enough said.

 

Blog

What we've been up to...

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A Lapsed History of Time

A quiet few weeks at LP Films? Far from it…just nothing we can talk about right now (keep your eyes on our blog, wechat and Facebook though). There’s plenty of running around, with multiple crews running on some days. We’ve seen the team on shoots down in Guangdong and more recently Macau, where we soaked up some good fortune under the warm glow of the casinos. Meanwhile, back at the office our pre-production team has been working tirelessly on new creative content for clients, whilst the post-production team has been polishing off some stellar commercial shoots. And all this to the sound of pop sensation Selina Gomez, who is a recent favorite of at least one British staff member…

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…but which Brit?

Today we’re getting ready to rig one of our infamous Black Boxes…which just happen to be yellow. This is one of the many systems we’ve developed over the years to help us shoot timelapse footage. We’re getting it ready today for a 4 day shoot, but we’ve previously used it for one which lasted several months.

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Black Box modeled by Nate Wang

Timelapse is the familiar process speeding up time on film. Traditionally, film is shot at 24 frames per second, which mimics human vision. Time lapse film runs much slower – maybe one frame per second, one per minute or one per hour. When played back at 24 frames per second, it can condense days, weeks or even years into a matter of minutes. The process is believed to have first appeared in cinema in 1987 in Georges Méliès Carrefour de l’Opéra (one of his many ‘lost films’) Since then, it has become common in everything from film (like Godfrey Reggio’s Qatsi trilogy) to nature documentary (like BBC’s Planet Earth) to commercials.

Head of Post-Production Nate Wang loves the timelapsed opening sequence of Lost In Hong Kong 港囧 (Xu Zheng, 2015), which he describes as, “a beautifully ambitious collision of day and night told through great editing.” Creative Planner Matthew Baren loves the motion timelapse in Requiem For A Dream (Darren Aronofsky, 2000) which captures its drug-addicted lead character frantically cleaning her apartment and utterly lost, whilst cinematographer Andrej Iliev prefers the simplicity of a flower blooming at the end of Adaptation. (Spike Jonze, 2002)

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end scene from Adaptation. (2002)

How do we use it here at LP Films? We’ve built a reputation for delivering high-quality timelapse sequences. We are able to handle a variety of technical requirements, through capture, processing and delivery. But we also believe in finding the best solution creatively. For some shoots, this means rigging fixed systems like the Black Box, which is designed to endure all kinds of weather for long periods without compromising the shot. We’ve also worked with shorter motion timelapses, with a crew moving the camera slowly over a short distance.

Screen Shot 2016-05-26 at 17.43.48Special Olympics hyperlapse (2007)

We are also fans of hyperlapse. Similar to motion timelapse, this involves moving the camera whilst the timelapse is taking place, but over a much longer distance. We first used this technique back in 2007 as part of our legacy documentary for Special Olympics. The shot traveled around Shanghai Stadium and took four hours to complete. Whilst stabilisation was initially an issue, the final result was spectacular. We’ve since used hyperlapse on a number of projects, including our Shanghai Expo 2010 film.

Check out our portfolio, or take a look at our hyperlapse trailer for a taste of what we’ve shot.

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Darkly Dreaming – Meet the Writer Behind Midnight Bites

“Food and sex are the two most important things in life. They’re primal. They come from darkness.” Screenwriter Jiao Yue is sharp, intuitive and maybe just a little sinister as she muses on the creative process behind Midnight Bites. The Inner Mongolia native is dressed in her customary black, with an elegant blue trench coat. There is a constant kindness to her face, as ideas swirl beneath the dark glass of her eyes.

“Many food shows on television are about ‘the good life,’ the ‘warm, easy life. Eventually it’s so boring! We’re doing something different.”

With blood soaked dishes and a sociopathic lead character, Midnight Bites certainly is different. The show was originally conceived by director Luo Tong as a delectable social satire with a foodie twist. Each episode is spat around the writer’s room by the creative team to beat out the concept, but it is Jiao Yue’s scripts which give it the eponymous bite. She then coaches star Nic Xu through the extensive monologues, work-shopping the nuance of the gags until they’re right. This collaboration is a process of discovery for them.

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“We are not as we think we are,” she muses. “Being fake or pretending to be someone else is a fact of Chinese life. Find a wife, a job…have a baby. Someone like Nic is supposed to ‘be a good man.’ But you’re not really that way.” And what about her?

“I should be a good girl!” she laughs.

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Writing had always been a hobby for Jiao Yue, and from a young age she had written poetry. She studied Journalism for seven years, first in Chongqing and then Nanjing, before moving to Shanghai. “I was a bad student, but I was very lucky,” she confesses. “But I’ve always wanted to see more.” She calls Shanghai the ‘dream city,’ a place brimming with opportunities for ambitious creatives like herself. She quickly joined LP Films as a copywriter, and two and a half years later, finds herself challenged by each new project. She is responsible for the scripts for LP’s commercial clients, as well as developing our in-house films. Those of you who follow LP Films on wechat will know her as the writer of the never-boring weekly updates.

“I love my job, and I love Midnight Bites. But we should be constantly striving to be better. The darkness of the show is all imagined. None of it really happens, so there’s plenty of scope. We’ve got a lot of exciting ideas, some quite twisted, but always honest and true.”

It’s a principle by which Jiao Yue lives her life. “True freedom is to be yourself. To dream, but to also face yourself.”

Where does she see herself in the future? She plans to keep writing, and hopes one day to make a theatre play or even her own feature film. “Or maybe I’ll open a restaurant…something dark and sexy.”

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Directions

When coming from the north: after passing IKEA on your right, keep heading south on Caoxi Road. Go past the next main intersection and then look out for a ‘7 Days Inn’ on the corner of Caoxi Road and Lane 258.  Turn right here then proceed down the lane and take the first right into compound number 23.

        • , Floor 2, Building 2, No.23, Lane 258, Caoxi Lu, Xuhui District, Shanghai, China
        • O +86 21 6451 5400
        • d +86 21 6451 5418
        • @ info@lpfilms.net

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